Book review and damned mark

This is a good book I’m currently reading.

Peter Thomas, a lecturer in environmental science at Keele University, recognised there was a hole in the literature of trees dealing with the technical side of tree growth etc in a straight-forward concise way.  It brings together a lot of information that is otherwise scattered over many books of far more technical depth, but the latter are referred to for further reading and lots of diagrams are included such as this:

It has taken me some time to find a book that covers the mechanics of how trees grow and die so I thought I’d share this.

I had a bizarre experience yesterday.  I noticed I’d run out of garlic presses so I turned a couple as relaxation from the heavy work on the double gates I’m making.

I now have a nice mark (impact stamp) so I bashed this into the tops.

First customer who wanted one said “Have you got one of these without Flying Shavings on it?” Doh!

He bought a potato masher instead!

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The Smoke

Down (well I live UP North, yes?) to London last weekend to visit my daughter whose birthday it was.

Lots of trees, but not much variety, I had always noticed there were lots of plane trees, but not how many.  They are everywhere, and not much else in the streets.  They looked pretty good in their autumn colours, and loads of leaves to kick about on the pavements.

OK these are mainly limes, but there were some pretty big plane leaves:

See the size of the sycamore next to it!

We went on the top of this building; The Blue Fin:

There were trees on the top!

It’s an extension of the canteen, rather more formal than the bodgery canteen, but it has some fruits, which turned out to be edible, but rather seedy:

The Strawberry Tree (Arbutus unedo), it’s a broadleaved evergreen, and the seeds are on the outside of the skin a la strawberry.  Doesn’t taste anything like strawberry though!  Native to the Mediterranean and Ireland and a member of the heather family.

In the middle of the Barbican (or Barbican’t, as we rechristened it, not being able to find anything doing on a Saturday morning) we saw a heron sleeping on St Giles’ church

It is a seriously strange ghostly place, will not be revisiting there in a hurry:

All those dwellings and hardly a soul about (it was All Hallows Eve) at 11am.

Maybe London looks prettier when it’s all put away for the night: